COVID-19: PHASE THREE GUIDELINES – 22nd September 2020

Introduction

 

On 22nd September 2020 the First Minister made a statement to Scottish Parliament to set- out a tightening of coronavirus-related restrictions, in response to an increase in the rate of spread of the virus. The priorities mentioned were to save lives and protect health, keep schools open, restart as many non-coronavirus NHS services as possible, and protect jobs by keeping businesses open where possible.

 

The key points announced today were:

• Private gatherings

oPeople will not be allowed to visit other households indoors. This extends the current guidance in the West of Scotland across Scotland as a whole. The public are asked to abide by this from Wednesday Sept 23rd and will be placed into law from Friday.

oThere are exceptions for extended households, non-cohabiting couples, informal childcare, trades people.

oIt is still acceptable to meet outdoors, including in private gardens, keeping to the 6 people / 2 household guidance.

oWhen outdoors, under 12s do not count towards either the 6 people or 2 household limit.

oWhen outdoors, 12 to 18 year olds must keep to the limit of 6 people, but are exempted from the 2 household limit.

  • Car sharing: People should not car share with those from outside their household.
  • Hospitality curfew: Pubs, restaurants and bars are required to close at 10pm.
  • Environmental health: Additional funding for local Environmental Health teams, allowing for greater capacity for inspections of businesses to enhance compliance and
  • Work from home: People should continue to work from home where possible. This message was reinforced
  • FACTS: The main public health ‘FACTS’ messaging remains: Face coverings; Avoid crowded places; Clean your hands regularly; Two meters distance; Self-isolate and book a test if you have
  • Self-isolating: A package of support will be made available for those who have to self-isolate, including a payment of £500 for those with low income (details to follow). No changes to ‘punishments’ for breaching self-isolation at this
  • Shielding: No return to shielding

 

The First Minister also noted that those potential changes which had an indicative date of 5 October are now further delayed. As a reminder, the potential changes most relevant for sport and physical activity were:

oIndoor contact sport: Allowed to resume for adults and young people aged 12 and over, following relevant SGB guidance. (Currently only allowed for children under 12.)

oSports stadia: Allowed to re-open for limited numbers. Planned test events will go ahead and further test events may take place before 5 October.

oEvents: There will be further relaxation of restrictions on indoor and outdoor events, although this will not allow all events and particularly large events to take place.

 

With this in mind we would encourage all partners to promote the Protect Scotland App, which is designed to help us protect each other, reduce the spread of Coronavirus and avoid further lockdowns further information can be found here https://www.protect.scot/

 

The Government updated Roadmap can be found here:

 

https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-phase-3-scotlands-route-map-update- 10th-september-2020/

 

THIS GUIDANCE HAS BEEN APPROVED BY SPORTSCOTLAND.

 

We urge everyone to be respectful of these guidelines to help prevent the spread of Coronavirus (COVID-19)

 

The Scottish Government continues to monitor the situation closely and has reintroduced further local restrictions so please be aware of any local restriction set by Government. We must not rule out the reintroduction of restrictions for sport, which could see activity suspended once again if public health measures dictate, or if the guidelines are not followed. It is therefore important that the equestrian community take the necessary steps outlined in this document prior to re-starting any activity and adhere to the guidelines, which could be subject to update or change at any time.

 

There may be a variance in guidelines and procedures throughout the UK and Scotland, and it is therefore important that riding schools, livery yards, venues/facilities, coaches, competition organisers and participants in Scotland follow the guidance outlined by horsescotland, their Local Authority and other guidance prepared by Scottish Government. Scottish Government guidance on return to work, health, physical distancing and hygiene etc can be found here https://www.gov.scot/coronavirus-covid-19/

 

To manage a safe return to sport and leisure activities it is a mandatory requirement that all clubs, facility operators and deliverers put in place comprehensive Test & Protect procedures to help break chains of transmission of Coronavirus (COVID-19). Further information is available within this guidance and at https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-test-and-protect/

 

 

People who are symptomatic should self-isolate for 10 days and household members for 14 days as per info on NHS guidance. No one who is self-isolating should attend a sports facility or activity.

 

 

 

Guidance Contents

 

General Guidelines

 

Health, Safety & Hygiene

 

Face Coverings

 

Equality & Inclusion

 

Facilities, Venues & Riding Centres

 

Test & Protect

 

Local Outbreaks or Clusters of COVID Cases

 

Changing rooms, lockers and Meeting Rooms

 

Equipment Provision & Use

 

Coaching and Instructions

 

Organised Sporting Activity for Children & Adults

 

Physical Distancing

 

Participant numbers and duration of Organised Activity

 

Competitions

 

Guidance for other Equine Professionals

 

Guidance for Riders/ Carriage Drivers

 

Furloughed Staff

 

 

 

General Guidelines

 

  • Within all Member bodies, Clubs, venues, competitions etc someone should take on the role as COVID-19 officer (Job role can be found here https://sportscotland.org.uk/media/5950/sportscotland-covid-officer.pdf) to ensure all appropriate management processes are in place so that they can effectively oversee and maintain the implementation of measures outlined herein.

 

A free e-learning module for COVID officers is available at https://rise.articulate.com/share/LlEWUj-o23H_4gC1AF002jdxdrCucQC0#/

 

  • Adult outdoor contact sports training and competition in an organised setting can resume, ideally with a maximum of 30 people taking part in any one session. However multiple sessions can take place at any one time or throughout the day as long as the groups don’t mix with a maximum of 200 per day.

 

  • Outdoor group coaching for organised sports and leisure activities including fitness classes can take place for a maximum of 30 people at any one time with multiple sessions per day as along as the groups don’t

 

  • From the 31 August 2020 indoor sport facilities (including the use of equestrian indoor arena’s) and leisure facilities are able to open if the Scottish Government guidance is fully implemented, this guidance can be found here https://gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-on-sport- andleisure-facilities/

 

this includes the provision of indoor non-contact and contact sport training and competition activities for children up to and including 11 years of age and;

 

indoor non-contact sport training and competition for those 12 years of age and over where physical distancing can be maintained.

 

  • An indicative date of 5th October 2020 had been identified by Scottish Government for further changes to sport and leisure, however this date is now delayed these activities include;

 

  • Limited spectator access to sports    Planned test events will go ahead and further test events may take place before 5 October.

 

  • Resumption of indoor contact sports and competition for those 12 years of age or older.

 

 

 

  • Track and Protect measures should be implemented for all activities to assist NHS Scotland in the event of a virus Further info can be found within this document

 

  • Travel guidance outlined by the Scottish Government should always be adhered to when travelling to/from and on arrival at any equestrian activity or competition. Information on       the    guidance           can      be        found  here https://gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-phase-3-staying-safe- and-protecting-others/pages/getting-around/

 

  • It is the responsibility of each sports facility operator, club committee and/or deliverer (herein referred to as sport facility operator) to undertake documented risk assessment, based on their local circumstances, prior to activity taking place. Consider safety first, particularly focusing on minimising the risk of infection/transmission. Appropriate measures must be put in place to ensure participants, staff  and         volunteers   are           always          protected.      Sample          risk assessments should be available from your National Body, including BHS.bhs.org.uk/advice-and-information/coronavirus-covid-19/risk- assessment

 

  • Sports facility operators should check with their insurance company that correct and full insurance cover is in place and valid before any activity takes

 

  • Where a disabled participant requires functional support to help them participate coaches or carers can provide this without maintaining physical distancing. In such circumstance the responsible ‘Covid Officer’ should consider appropriate mitigating actions as part of the risk assessment. For instance, providing appropriate PPE, limiting the number of participants an individual provides functional support to, limiting the duration spent in close proximity, or a combination of

 

Guidelines will be updated as we progress through the different phases of the Scottish Government route map. Please ensure to check www.horsescotland.org on a regular basis to stay abreast of the latest guidelines.

 

 

Health, Safety and Hygiene

 

Ensure usual access to first aid and emergency equipment is maintained. Please ensure the first aid equipment has been updated appropriately for the COVID pandemic and first aiders have been appropriately trained. In the event of first aid

 

treatment being required it is recognised that a suitably qualified person, coach or supervising adult may require to attend to the injured participant. The ‘Covid Officer’ (see above) should consider processes for managing this as part of their risk assessment. This could include but not be limited to;

  • Provision of suitable PPE
  • Training of coaches/supervising adults
  • Presence of one parent/guardian being required at the activity for children/vulnerable

 

  • Clear guidance and plans are needed for cleaning of facilities and equipment, and waste disposal. For instance, common touchpoint surfaces (gates, door handles, handrails etc) should where possible be left open but if not possible, regular cleaning with disposable gloves should be undertaken. Cleaning of equipment, hand and respiratory hygiene are core measures to be implemented and provision should be made for

 

  • Make hand sanitisers or wipes available for use at entrance/exit to venue/facility where possible. Hand sanitiser should be at least 60% alcohol based and detergent wipes should be appropriate for the surface they are being used on. Cleaning products should conform to EN14476 standard or any detergent is followed by chlorine releasing
  • Clean all common touchpoint surfaces (gates, door handles, handrails etc) regularly, wearing disposable gloves

 

A checklist of considerations and actions is available here: https://sportscotland.org.uk/media/5723/getting-your-facilites-fit-for-sport.pdf

 

 

Face Coverings

 

  • Sports facility operators should ensure participants and visitors wear face coverings, if indoors, before and after activity or when in non-playing areas of the facility. For example: reception, locker rooms and storage areas. This is a mandatory requirement except where an exemption applies, or where there isa ‘reasonable excuse’ not to wear a face covering. For example, if you have a health condition or you are disabled, including hidden disabilities such as autism, dementia or a learning

 

  • Be aware that face coverings discriminate against some deaf people who need to look at lips to help Staff in facilities should be made aware that it is okay to remove their face coverings to communicate with someone who relies on lip reading and facial expressions.
  • Face coverings may not be required when using hospitality services such as café’s, bars and restaurants. For further information refer to Scottish Government Coronavirus (COVID-19): tourism and hospitality sector

 

https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-tourism-and-hospitality-sector- guidance/pages/hospitality-statutory-guidance/

 

  • The Coronavirus (COVID-19) Phase 3: staying safe and protecting others, face coverings provides guidance on general use and exemptions Guidance can be found here https://gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-phase-3- staying-safe-and-protecting-others/pages/face-coverings/

 

 

Detailed guidance is also available at;

https://www.hps.scot.nhs.uk/web-resources-container/covid-19-guidance-for-non- healthcare-settings/

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-decontamination-in-non- healthcare-settings

 

https://www.hps.scot.nhs.uk/a-to-z-of-topics/hand-hygiene/

 

https://www.sja.org.uk/get-advice/first-aid-advice/covid-19-advice-for-first-aiders/

 

https://www.hse.gov.uk/coronavirus/first-aid-and-medicals/first-aid-certificate- coronavirus.htm

 

 

 

Equality & Inclusion

 

  • Covid-19 is affecting But the impact of the pandemic is not being felt equally. Before the pandemic certain groups were less likely to participate in sport and physical activity. These groups are also the most at risk of worsening inequalities due to Covid-19:

 

  • Older people
  • Disabled people
  • Ethnic minorities
  • Women
  • People from deprived communities

 

  • It is more important than ever to consider inclusive guidance for people who need extra support to be active and sports facility operators should consider this as part of their work to encourage people to

 

  • The evidence emerging has clear implications for how we design and deliver sport and physical activity. Some key areas for consideration include;

 

  • Communication – Digital exclusion is a key issue. With so many services and so much information moving online it risks worsening the health impacts of the pandemic. We have to think innovatively about the range of ways we can provide information to people about sport and physical

 

  • Accessibility – Accessibility of our environments is another key issue emerging from the pandemic. As clubs and leisure centres re-open it’s important to build understanding of people’s specific accessibility needs around things like hygiene, physical distancing and face coverings so we can provide the best possible support to people to take part in sport and physical

 

  • Anxiety, mental health and wellbeing – The pandemic is leading to an increased risk of anxiety and mental ill-health for people who share all characteristics. We know that sport and physical activity can have significant benefits for people’s mental health so it’s vital that we continue to promote those benefits, so people are encouraged to get

 

  • Confidence – Confidence to return to sport is a big issue across all groups. We know that some groups are at higher risk from Covid-19 than others (including some ethnic minorities, disabled people and households experiencing poverty). These groups may be even more nervous about returning to sport or starting to participate. They are also less likely to participate in sport in the first place, so we’ll need to give extra attention to their needs to help build their

 

 

 

Facilities, Venues and Riding Centres

 

Ensure your facility management team has put in place appropriate mechanisms for overseeing operations and risk management.

 

A Covid officer should be put in place within each facility https://sportscotland.org.uk/media/5950/sportscotland-covid-officer.pdf to ensure all appropriate management processes are in place so that they can effectively oversee and maintain the implementation of measures outlined herein.

 

A      free      e-learning      module      for       COVID      officers      is      available      at https://rise.articulate.com/share/LlEWUj-o23H_4gC1AF002jdxdrCucQC0#/

 

 

  • sportscotland has also produced Getting your Facilities Fit for Sport resource to help sport facility operators prepare for reopening. The resource supports Scottish Government guidance by providing further detailed checklists for the reopening of a range of sport specific facilities. Which can be found here https://sportscotland.org.uk/media/5723/getting-your-facilites-fit-for-sport.pdf

 

  • Permanent outdoor sport, leisure and club facilities which are accessed on regular basis by the general public and/or club members and have in place a

 

designated COVID officer and appropriate risk assessments may exceed the limit of 200 people, in a single day, if mitigating measures are put in place to protect participants and staff. This may for instance include operating separate activity zones, implementing staggered time slots and putting in place other measures to ensure participation bubbles remain separate including consideration of parking and access/egress.

  • Venues/ Facilities and Riding Centres should focus on providing sporting activity involving as few participants as possible, for the minimum amount of time, whilst still allowing the activity to run effectively. This may also require a change to game formats, numbers and/or rules to minimise risk to

 

Test and Protect

 

  • Test and Protect, is Scotland’s way of putting into practice NHS Scotland’s test, trace, isolate and support strategy. Containing outbreaks early is crucial to reduce the spread of COVID-19, protect the NHS and save lives, and avoid the reintroduction of social and economic lockdown. This will support the country to return to, and maintain, a more normal way of

 

Maintaining customer records

 

  • It is a mandatory requirement that sport facility operators collect the name, contact number, date of visit, time of arrival, and where possible the departure time of all those attending facilities or activities. Where attending as a small household group, the contact details for one member – a ‘lead member’ – will be sufficient.

 

  • Sports facility operators should store information for 21 days and share it when requested to do so by public health

 

  • The Coronavirus (COVID-19): Test and Protect information leaflet provides information on the Test and Protect service from NHS

 

Registration with the Information Commissioner’s Office

  • In order to gather and store customer information securely, sports facility operators may need to be registered with the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO). This will be the case if you are using an electronic system to gather and store

 

  • If you are unsure whether you need to register, please contact the ICO via their helpline on 0303 123 1113, or visit ico.org.uk.

 

Protect Scotland App

 

  • NHS Scotland has launched a free mobile app designed to help with contact tracing efforts and slow the spread of COVID-19. The app will alert users if they have been in close contact with another app user who tests positive for coronavirus.

 

  • Supported by a dedicated Protect Scotland website, the app is an extra tool complementing existing person-to-person contact tracing which remains the main component of NHS Scotland’s Test and Protect system.

 

  • Further information on the Protect Scotland app is available at protect.scot.

 

What should someone do if they have coronavirus symptoms?

  • If a person has a continuous cough, high temperature, or loss or change in taste or smell, they should self-isolate and request a coronavirus test right away. Further information is available at NHSinform.scot/test-and-protect or by calling 0800 028 2816 if they cannot get online.

 

 

Local Outbreaks or Clusters of Coronavirus Cases

 

  • Where a local outbreak has been reported, sports facility operators and deliverers within this locality should review Scottish Government ‘local measures’ guidance, their facility/operational risk assessment and consider if additional mitigating actions should be put in place to reduce risk. This may, for example, include; suspending activity, enhancing hygiene and physical distancing measures or introducing additional activity

 

 

Changing rooms, Lockers and Meeting Rooms

Use of changing rooms and showering facilities should be avoided where possible, although from the 31 August 2020 they may be made available for participants with disabilities or special needs or where required after an activity such as swimming.

 

Sports facility operators may open toilets for public use if they follow the guidelines        outlined          on        the      Scottish                          Government            website https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-public-and-customer- toilets-guidance/pages/overview/

 

For detailed facility guidance including a checklist that covers use of changing rooms,   showers         and     toilets  visit                     Scottish         Government https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-on-sport- and-leisure-facilities/

 

Locker Rooms – From the 31 August 2020 access to indoor locker rooms and storage areas is permitted for the dropping off and collection of sports equipment or clothing. The sports facility operator should ensure mitigating actions are put in place to minimise the risk of virus transmission including physical distancing, hygiene and cleaning measures.

 

Meeting Rooms – Working from home and working flexibly, where possible, remain the default. The Scottish Government’s Route map states that the date that non-essential offices and call centres can re-open is still under review. Although we appreciate gym and leisure facilities are able to reopen on 31 August, we would encourage providers to consider whether internal meetings and training must be completed in person. Or whether these can be completed online or via telephone. If it is essential that meetings and training takes place in person, Scottish Government guidance for general workplaces must be followed and a risk assessment should be completed. The guidance can be found here https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-general- guidance-for-safer-workplaces/

 

Indoor and outdoor hospitality, including clubhouses and sports facilities which provide catering and bar services, can operate providing they adhere to Scottish      Government         guidance        which         is         available        at https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-tourism-and- hospitality-sector-guidance/pages/hospitality-statutory-guidance/

 

Retail units operated by sports facility operators may reopen provided all specific Scottish Government guidance for retailers is in place and adhered to. Further  information                         from                   the  Scottish          Government  is         available                 at https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-retail-sector- guidance/.

 

No spectating should take place other than where a parent is supervising a child or vulnerable adult. Physical distancing guidance should always be followed.

 

Limits on the number of participants accessing sports facilities should be risk assessed to ensure physical distancing can be maintained. This should take into consideration Scottish Government guidance on physical distancing and any exceptions highlighted within this document where sporting ‘bubbles’ are created for the duration of an activity.

 

Equipment provision and use

 

Sports facility operators should, where possible, remove equipment including benches, scoreboards, tables and any other objects that are not essential for participation purposes.

 

Where the above is not possible appropriate cleaning measures, including provision of sanitiser and disposable gloves, should be put in place to reduce the risk of contamination.

 

Bins may be provided but should be regularly checked, cleaned/sanitised, emptied and disposed of using appropriate personal protective equipment.

 

All fixed equipment should be checked prior to use to avoid participants having to adjust or touch it.

 

Where shared equipment is necessary for an activity appropriate hygiene measures must be put in place to ensure the equipment is thoroughly cleaned before, during and after use.

 

Where Poles and jump cups etc are used in arenas a risk assessment should be undertaken to ensure measures are put in place to minimise uncovered body contact. Appropriate hygiene protocols should be undertaken including hand hygiene before, during and after exercise.

 

 

 

  • Bookings and payment

Online bookings should be taken if possible. However, be aware that a proportion of disabled people, people from low income households and older adults do not have access to the internet. Ensure you have alternative measures in place. For example, telephone bookings. .

 

Consider introducing buffer periods between sessions to stagger start times so that participants do not all arrive/leave at the same time.

 

Where possible use online or contactless payment options and avoid handling cash.

 

  • Communication with members/customers

Sports facility operators should communicate clearly and regularly with members and participants setting out what they are doing to manage risk, and what advice they are giving to individuals before, during and after visits to the venue/activity.

 

Make them aware in advance of measures you are putting in place at your venue, and guidelines they are asked to follow.

 

Ideally sports facility operators should publish an action plan detailing their plans to re-open safely.

 

Communicate clearly opening times and how people can safely access a facility, if relevant, for example through a booking or queuing system.

 

It is more important than ever to consider inclusive guidance for people who need support to be active and sports facility operators should consider this as part of their work to encourage people to return.

 

Ensure signage on guidelines for participating safely and promoting hygiene measures are clearly displayed and up to date.

 

  • Workforce

Sports facility operators must ensure that relevant workplace guidance is followed for contractors and staff and ensure existing health and safety advice is maintained and aligned. This should be detailed in the risk assessment.

 

Coaching and Instructing

 

Guidance for coaches, leaders, personal trainers, and instructors (herein referred to as coaches) is available at https://sportscotland.org.uk/covid- 19/getting-coaches-ready-for-sport/

 

  • Coaches can work outdoors with up to 30 people per session, there is no limit on the number of sessions per day however each session must not mix. Appropriate risk assessments, physical distancing, Test & Protect (see above) and hygiene measures should be put in place to protect

 

 

  • Indoors coaching sessions numbers should be limited depending on the risk assessed with physical distancing, size and ventilation of the arena and hygiene measures put in place to protect participants and coaches. More info can be found here https://gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance- on-sport-and-leisure-facilities/

 

  • Coaches and instructors working with children should familiarise themselves with the      additional       considerations developed     by                  Children               1st: https://children1st.org.uk/help-for-families/safeguarding-in- sport/safeguarding-in-sport-resources/

 

 

 

 

Organised Sporting Activity for Children and Adults

 

  • Organised indoor and outdoor sporting activity/competition for children and adults may be undertaken as outlined below and where appropriate horsescotland approved guidance is

 

  • All sport facility operators providing organised competitions must abide by relevant horsescotland guidance and have a named ‘Covid Officer’ (see above for details) who will be responsible for completing documented risk assessments and ensuring all appropriate mitigations are put in

 

  • Total numbers taking part in training, competition or events, other than detailed below, should not exceed 200 people in any one day, including organisers, officials and participants. Once an individual has completed their activity, they should immediately vacate the ‘field of play’ and are then subject to normal household
  • Permanent outdoor sport, leisure and club facilities which are accessed on regular basis by the general public and/or club members and have in place a designated COVID officer and appropriate risk assessments may exceed the limit of 200 people, in a single day, if mitigating measures are put in place to protect participants and This may for instance include operating separate activity zones, implementing staggered time slots and putting in place other measures to ensure participation bubbles remain separate including consideration of parking and access/egress.
  • Organisations/Venues should focus on providing sporting activity involving as few participants as possible, for the minimum amount of time, whilst still allowing the activity to run effectively. This may also require a change to game formats, numbers and/or rules to minimise risk to

 

  • Definitions – for the purposes of this guidance;
    • Contact sport or activity is defined as “a sport or activity in which the participants necessarily come into bodily contact with one another”.

 

  • Non-contact sport or activity is defined as “a sport or activity in which the participants are physically separated by playing rules such as to make it difficult for them to make physical contact during the course of an

 

  • Non-contact sports where participants would normally encroach within 2m should put in place measures to limit this risk. For instance, training only or competition with altered rules to maintain physical

 

  • Sports competition refers to where participants or teams compete against different opponents as part of an organised league or

 

  • Children and Young People

 

  • Outdoor/Indoor contact and non-contact sport and competition can be undertaken by children and young people up to and including the age of 11

 

 

 

  • Adults

 

  • Adult outdoor non contact and contact sport training, activity and competition in an organised setting may resume with a maximum of up to 30 people taking part in any one session, however multiple sessions can take place throughout the day with a maximum number of 200 per day. We would suggest that those organising and officiating at any training, activity or competition create bubbles of up to 30 people to ensure the smooth running of the event. These bubbles must not mix with other bubbles and must remain socially distant from participant bubbles.

 

  • Adult Indoor non-contact sports training, leisure activity and competition may resume subject to appropriate physical distancing measures being put in place to limit the risk of participants encroaching within 2m.

 

  • No adult indoor contact sport should be undertaken at this time.

 

All sports facility operators providing sport specific activities must abide by relevant SGB guidance and have an appointed ‘Covid Officer’ (see above for details) who will complete documented risk assessments and ensure appropriate mitigations are put in place before any sporting activity is undertaken.

 

 

 

 

Physical Distancing

 

Children aged 11 years and younger are not required to physically distance at any time, as set out in Scottish Government guidance.

 

For those over 12 years of age taking part in an organised activity Outdoors or indoors, a ‘field of play bubble’ can be created whilst a sporting activity is taking place, in effect suspending physical distancing guidelines for the duration of the activity. Normal physical distancing guidelines will however apply before and after the activity takes place.

 

For those over 12 years of age taking part in Outdoor/Indoor sporting or leisure activity normal physical distancing rules should be followed. Risk assessments should, where possible, consider mitigating actions to reduce the likelihood of participants encroaching within 2m of each other. For instance, sports facility operators may consider, where appropriate, different formats of competition, zoned participation areas or staggered starts.

 

No formal presentation ceremonies should take place during or after an activity or competition and the focus should be on reducing numbers in attendance at any one time.

 

Coaches and others supporting organised activity should attempt to keep physically distant where possible, but it is recognised that this will not always be possible. In such circumstances the responsible ‘Covid Officer’ (see above) should consider appropriate mitigating actions as part of the risk assessment.

 

Specific consideration should be given to supervision of children under the age of 5 years as it is not appropriate for young children to maintain the models of physical distancing that are suitable for older children, either practically or in terms of child development. You may, for instance, ask a parent to be present.

 

Where an employee is providing an activity, relevant work placed risk assessments and consultation should take place in advance of any activity being undertaken. See the Businesses, workplaces and self-employed people section at https://www.gov.scot/coronavirus-covid-19/

 

Parents/guardians who are supervising their children should abide by Scottish Government physical distancing guidance and stay at least 2m away from those out with their own household. Groups of parents from different households should not congregate before, during or after the activity.

 

Participant numbers and duration of organised activity

 

A ‘field of play bubble’ can be created whilst a sporting activity is taking place, in effect suspending Scottish Government household number guidelines for the duration of the activity, if appropriate guidance is agreed with sportscotland as highlighted herein. Normal household guidelines will however apply before and after the activity takes place for those aged 12 years and over. This horsescotland guidance has been approved by sportscotland.

 

Where there is likely to be close contact between participants in an organised sporting activity, mitigation should be put in place to minimise risk and keep participants safe.

 

The focus should be on delivering the organised activity with as few participants as possible interacting with each other and for the minimum amount of time, whilst still allowing the activity to be run effectively.

 

Holiday camps or extended sports activity which would not normally come under the jurisdiction of an SGB should refer to

 

the appropriate local authority, umbrella body or care commission guidance. Organisers of these activities may alternatively wish to use Scottish Government household, physical distancing and group size limits should be applied.

 

  • Adult involvement and ratios;

All adults involved in coaching / actively engaging with children or vulnerable adults in an organised environment should have undertaken appropriate SGB safeguarding and, where available, Covid-19 training.

 

Sports organisations should always ensure appropriate ratios of coach/adult to child/vulnerable adult as per SGB guidance and follow all related safeguarding advice.

 

Health, safety and welfare policies should always be risk assessed and implemented.

 

 

Competitions

 

  • Organised Outdoor/ Indoor Competitions
    • Organised outdoor/ Indoor contact sport activity can be undertaken by children, young people while Adults can take part in contact and non contact Outdoors they can only take part in non contact sport indoors subject to following this horsescotland guidance as agreed with sport

 

  • Participant numbers and duration of organised activity;
  • Where there is likely to be close contact between participants in an organised sporting activity, mitigation should be put in place to minimise risk and keep participants
  • The participant numbers indoors will need to be dependent on the size and ventilation of the facility more information can be found here https://sportscotland.org.uk/covid-19/getting-your- facilities-fit-for-sport/ and cibse.org

 

 

  • The focus should be on delivering the organised activity with as few participants as possible interacting with each other and for the minimum amount of time, whilst still allowing the activity to be run

 

  • Spectating, other than by a parent/guardian or coach should not be

 

  • Travel guidance outlined by the Scottish Government should always be adhered to when travelling to/from and whilst on site at any equestrian

 

activity or competition. Information on the guidance can be found here https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-phase-3- staying-safe-and-protecting-others/pages/getting-around/

 

  • All sports Governing bodies/organisations/venue operators providing such activity must abide by relevant horsescotland guidance and have a named ‘Covid Officer’. A template job description for a ‘Covid Officer’ can be found here on the sportscotland website https://sportscotland.org.uk/media/5950/sportscotland-covid-

officer.pdf

 

A    free    e-learning    module    for    COVID    officers    is    available    at https://rise.articulate.com/share/LlEWUj- o23H_4gC1AF002jdxdrCucQC0#/

 

 

  • Physical distancing;
  • Children aged 11 years and younger are not required to physically distance, as set out in Scottish Government guidance. This extends to organised sports activity and the field of

 

  • For 12-17 year old participants a ‘field of play bubble’ can be created during organised sports activity that allows contact whilst the activity is taking place, in effect suspending physical distancing guidelines for the duration of the activity. Normal physical distancing guidelines will however apply before and after the activity takes place.

 

  • We suggest that those organising and officiating at the competition create bubbles of up to 30 people to ensure the smooth running of the

 

  • Specific consideration should be given to supervision of children under the age of 5 years as it is not appropriate for young children to maintain the models of physical distancing that are suitable for older children, either practically or in terms of child development. You may, for instance, ask a parent to be

 

  • Where an employee is providing an activity, relevant work placed risk assessments and consultation should take place in advance of any activity being See the Businesses, workplaces and self      -employed people     section                 at https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-public- and-customer-toilets-guidance/pages/overview/.

 

  • Parents/guardians who are supervising their children should abide by Scottish Government physical distancing guidance and stay at least 2m away from those out with their own household. Groups of parents from different households should not congregate before, during or after the

 

  • Health, safety & hygiene measures for all activity should be in line with guidance provided within this

 

  • In the event of first aid treatment being required it is recognised that a suitably qualified person, coach or supervising adult may require to attend to the injured participant. The sports organisation/venue ‘Covid Officer’ should consider processes for managing this as part of the risk assessment. This could include but not be limited to;
    • Provision of suitable PPE
    • Training of coaches/supervising adults
    • Presence of one parent/guardian being required at the activity for children/vulnerable

 

A template job description for a ‘Covid Officer’ can be found here on the sportscotland website https://sportscotland.org.uk/media/5950/sportscotland- covid-officer.pdf

 

A free e-learning module for COVID officers is available at https://rise.articulate.com/share/LlEWUj-o23H_4gC1AF002jdxdrCucQC0#/

 

 

 

Equestrian competitions which do not follow approved horsescotland guidance should not take place at this time, unless direct Scottish Government approval has been granted.

 

 

Guidance for other Equine Professionals

  • Other equine professionals can attend your horse.
  • Where third party premises are utilised, prior agreement should be sought from the facility
  • Any professional support network member that is in any doubt should seek clarification from their insurance provider and/or registered
  • Online bookings should be taken if possible. If not, alterative measures should be put in place to avoid physical

 

 

 

 

Guidance for Riders/Carriage Drivers

Riders and Carriage Drivers should read these guidelines in conjunction with the updated Scottish Government guidance on health, physical distancing, and hygiene. Participants should be aware of and adapt to changes in guidance at short notice.

 

Information on Scottish Governments approach to managing COVID-19 is available at:

https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-phase-3-scotlands-route-map-update- 10th-september-2020/

 

Those accessing the Scottish Countryside should do so responsibility, you should consider reviewing the British Horse Society Scotland’s Resources on Equestrian Assess which can be found here https://www.bhs.org.uk/bhs-in-your- area/scotland/resources/scottish-access-resources

 

 

Where riders/ Drivers arrange to meet social for Equestrian activity must do so within the Government guidance around social gathering

Revised social gathering rules: 6 people from up to 2 households can meet socially. (Under 12s from the 2 households are not counted within this limit).

 

 

Furloughed staff

 

  • It is for each employer to decide when it is the appropriate time to return staff to work from the Coronavirus Government Job Retention Scheme, changes were made to the Job Retention Scheme on the 1st August to remain update follow this link https://gov.uk/government/collections/coronavirus-job- retention-scheme.

 

  • A furloughed employee can take part in volunteer work if they do not provide services to, or generate revenue linked to your business.

 

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